Why I Haven’t Quit

Like many young professionals, I have a LinkedIn account. I am sure it is the same in other industries as well, but recruiters (or as I like to call them – head hunters) will reach out to me on a weekly basis at a minimum. Usually I blow these guys and gals off, but if the job actually sounds interesting I may ask for more information but the buck usually stops there. On top of the LinkedIn messages, some people who have left my company actually sell the company’s Outlook address book to recruiters, so you might even get phone calls as well!

What I have learned is if you are experienced and skilled in your trade or profession, there are plenty of opportunities to jump ship and go elsewhere (especially in a place like NYC), usually for more money. I have friends who are constantly in contact with recruiters trying to find the next best job. Maybe a little more pay, maybe a little better commute, maybe a little more pay, maybe a better boss, and finally MORE PAY! These people are unhappy in their current jobs usually because they are not fulfilled in their job and usually the feel they are not compensated at market value.

From these dealings with recruiters and other companies I know I could easily leave my job, and get a fairly substantial raise. I have considered it multiple times as I see the dollar signs scrolling across the front of my eyes. Of course more money equals higher savings rate and faster path to FI/RE! Luckily I let calmer heads prevail and usually do not go further than to ask for more information about these positions. At the end of the day I don’t hate my job. Do I love it and would do it for free? Hell no, but the reasons I don’t leave my current job have nothing to do with money.

The People – I’m currently in my third job of my career (but only second company) and I have met friends at each which I still keep close contact with to this day. Of course there is always that person in the office that you hope doesn’t stop you in the hallway to chit-chat, but for the most part I’ve made friends at work. Overall they have been great people who I share interests with and are just genuinely nice to be around.

Currently I have actually found myself in a lucky situation. I seem to get along with my coworkers AND my superiors. For the most part it seems like the two bosses I work for a majority of the time actually care (somewhat at least, better than don’t care at all) about my personal well being. They have been considerate with work load, allowing me to “sign-off” during PTO, invited me to their home, etc. Now I know others in my group at work aren’t as lucky and I’m therefore thankful. It took luck, but it also took me identifying who I really liked and pushing hard to work for them. At the end of the day, you do have more control over your work situation than you may think.

The Work – At the end of the day work is work. I know that leaving one job for another is not going to make me happier, because the grass is not always greener. I like numbers and being analytical but unfortunately I still have to report to management, charge my hours, fill out performance evaluations, etc., etc. Therefore I try to catch myself before getting overly excited over a perhaps “embellished” job description that might find its way into my inbox. Truth be told I currently don’t hate my work, and actually enjoy some parts of it. I’m not willing to take another job offer just because it pays more to learn that I like the work less than I currently do.

The Flexibility – My job is extremely flexible. I currently work in small teams and at times we are scattered all over the US. This makes working from home or another state very easy when I want to do some personal travel without taking PTO or just not change out of my sweat pants. For the most part, as long as I get my shit done, no one cares too much about where I’m doing it. Fridays good luck finding me in the office. The only time I come in on Fridays is when my boss dangles free lunch in front of my face and offers to take me out to a decent restaurant if I come in.

On the subject of PTO, I get a ton! I am in a profession where burnout is pretty regular and the company actually does a good job of allowing for a lot of PTO, which I definitely take advantage of. You’ll never see me losing PTO because “I’m too busy to take it.” I never felt bad for people who complained about being too busy to take PTO, because that just meant you are doing a very poor job of managing up and managing expectations. I really don’t know anyone else who gets as much PTO as me (maybe a teacher with summers off), so I’m sure if I left I would have to cut back on my away from work time which I don’t think I’d be too happy about.

I have come to the realization that if I left my job for another, it most likely wouldn’t increase my happiness. That raise wouldn’t make up for the hard work I’ve put in to build relationships and flexibility into my job. For that reason I have stayed put… so far.

What keeps you at your job? Have you jumped ship to another company recently? Could you leave for more money but choose not to?

50 thoughts on “Why I Haven’t Quit

  1. Brian @DebtDiscipline

    Well I’ve been in my new job officially one day. So far so good. 🙂 Sure pay helps, but the overall environment is so important as you described. To use a buzz word I can’t stand being micro-managed. Unless you do you homework and talk with people who have worked at a potential new company or current employees of that company you will have no idea what you may be walking into other that a raise.
    Brian @DebtDiscipline recently posted…I’ve LandedMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Glad day one was good! Work environment is huge. If it’s bad, you’ll take that home with you which is never good.

      Reply
  2. Norm

    I agree, the people are half the battle. Work is work, it’s the people that make it easy or difficult. If you have to be around people you hate, that’s not a job worth staying in, no matter the pay. The last time I interviewed for another job was when I was working with someone I genuinely hated. Luckily, he was fired, and after that I was happy as a clam to stay where I am.

    Also, I got a big salary bump this year, and since I’m union, I get at least one raise every year, plus another one from our contract if we get a cost of living increase. Since I can’t imagine getting another promotion after being in my new title for less than a year, I see the scheduled raises laid out in front of me and I see no reason to leave my job before my anticipated retirement date.
    Norm recently posted…Ridinkulous Goals For 2016My Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Great job Norm. Sounds like you found a good fit to get you to your goals without big headaches along the way.

      Reply
  3. Gwen

    I’d love to leave my job. The company is a solid one, but currently going through a downturn. I’m in IT, so I’d love to go to an IT company. However, due to the way my early development program has worked out, I have basically no experiencein anything I’d like to do. I literally couldn’t leave if I wanted to. I could leave, but I’d be taking a HUGE paycut and that’s the last thing I want to do. I have one more year in this position, and then 2 years to gain experience. So 3 years before I can really leave this company. Urgh.
    Gwen recently posted…I won the lottery!My Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Once you get a few more years of experience under your belt, I’m sure the doors will open to great opportunities! Don’t dwell on the length of time too hard.

      Reply
  4. Tawcan

    I changed my job function over 6 months ago while staying with the same company. I went from engineering to marketing, which is a complete change of career for me. My rationale was that I wanted to expand my skill set and switching within the same company allowed me to keep similar salary level instead of starting fresh. Yes, jumping from companies to companies will most likely give you better salary but ask yourself, is it worth it? You seem to have a good work environment and enjoy working with your co-workers. If you change your job, who knows what would happen right?
    Tawcan recently posted…Is Japan Rail Pass worth purchasing?My Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Wow that’s quite the change! I agree it’s much easier to do when you stay in the same company. I know many people who have made changes and kept their title and salary even though they had very little to no experience in the new job. Good work!

      Reply
    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      I get about the same amount of time off, but no every other Mondays 🙁 Seems like a great fit for you and your family!

      Reply
  5. Amber Tree

    About 18 months ago I switched company and role. After a lot of time in pure business analysis/project management role – actually called engineering in that company – I decided to switch towards a more marketing role where I would be able to leverage my previous skills.
    After 15+ years of working experience and several companies, I came to realise that there is always a reason to change.
    Right now, I more look at the reasons to stay. And Money is not the most important one. I prefer much more work-life balance, the content of the job, interactions with people, impact you can have.
    Amber Tree recently posted…The play moneyMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      It’s not all about the Benjamins, that’s for sure. All the other non-money related things are just as important and can actually have a direct impact on your happiness on an everyday basis.

      Reply
  6. Our Next Life

    Good for you for staying put! Both Mr. ONL and I have been in our jobs a long time (like over a decade), for many of the same reasons. I for sure know I could make more switching employers, but I like my company and the people I work with for the most part, and have some nice perks, like working from home. Having some certainty about the work is worth more than a pay bump, in my opinion!
    Our Next Life recently posted…What Do You Want Your Tombstone to Say? // Defining Our PurposeMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Getting along with coworkers and “bosses” is huge. At this time more money isn’t worth the possibility of losing flexibility or possibly working for/with people at kind of suck 🙂

      Reply
  7. Matt @ The Resume Gap

    There have been a couple times in my career when I’ve felt underpaid relative to what I could get elsewhere, and rather than just jump ship, I’ve approached my boss and very openly said, “I’m asking for a raise.” Not every company will be able to negotiate on a one-off basis like that, but if you’re able to justify your value and share comps from other roles for which you’re qualified, it can be effective. If you’re a valuable employee, it’s often cheaper for the company to pay you more rather than lose you entirely — and a lot easier for you to stay if you enjoy the work and the team.
    Matt @ The Resume Gap recently posted…Happy Friday: It’s A PrivilegeMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      I’ve tried that, but at my company there are a lot of peers that do the same job as me. So basically they stick me in my “band” of a bunch of peers and negotiating basically falls on deaf ears. They are all about keeping the collective group happy, rather than giving me a bigger bump, so that it doesn’t start problems throughout. I’d keep it a secret though 😉

      Reply
  8. Steve @ Think Save Retire

    I think you have the absolute right attitude, Fervent. Like you, I’ve discovered that changing jobs, especially in the same industry, largely results in a lot of the same stuff. Same stuff, different company. It would be one thing if you were actually changing industries to do something completely different.

    It definitely sounds like some of the benefits of working for your current company outweigh straight salary that you might be able to increase at other places. It’s tough to find a place where you have so much flexibility, and leaving it for another company is definitely something that deserves the utmost thought!

    Sounds like you’re making the right decision.
    Steve @ Think Save Retire recently posted…Believe early retirement is a privilege? I sure don’t!My Profile

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  9. Anum @ Current on Currency

    Good for you on choosing to stay! I respect your decision, because like you said, your work environment, relationships, and flexibility are all important factors to consider. A lot of people jump ship simply at the chance of earning a higher salary, but there are so many other aspects to consider, like you mentioned.

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      I agree Anum. I know people who leave for more dolla bills and are sadly disappointed with the work, coworkers, and overall environment.

      Reply
  10. DC @ Young Adult Money

    The flexibility aspect of your job sounds great. I have only been at one company…but it’s a massive one so I really see it as a bunch of companies within one (in a way). I went from one side of the company to the other about a year and a half ago and it was a great move. I was comfortable at my previous job, but taking the risk and moving to a brand new part of the company with people I did not know was a leap of faith. I’m very happy now, but it could have been a bad move – you never know. I don’t foresee leaving, either, mainly because of the people (superiors in particular). Maybe a few years down the road but I don’t see myself moving at all for 2-3 years, even within the company.
    DC @ Young Adult Money recently posted…4 Things I Do Every Month to Manage My MoneyMy Profile

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  11. Red to Riches

    Ahhh, you said charge hours and I had flashbacks to my old job where it would be the end of the week and I’d be missing like 5 hours that I knew I worked but I couldn’t recall what client or project I was working on. Definitely was my least favorite thing.

    A good boss, a good commute, decent work, decent balance, and decent pay is all one can ask for. But missing one of those crucial links can make everything miserable.

    My past job was notorious for loads of PTO (5-7 weeks total depending on level), but everyone at the manager level lost at least 2-4 weeks every year because they didn’t have time to take it. So sad.

    The good news is if you change industries and have a flexible employer, PTO is negotiable and with my experience it was easier to negotiate an extra week compared to the equivalent salary increase.
    Red to Riches recently posted…2016 Financial GoalsMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Nice work negotiating PTO! You are right though one missing link in that equation can make a job pretty miserable. Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply
  12. Mrs. Mad Money Monster

    I have always been amazed when people tell me they rolled over vacation days from the previous year. That has NEVER happened to me. I refuse to not take my vacation/PTO time. Like you, I mostly enjoy my job. If I have to have one, it’s a pretty good deal. I have been in the same industry since college, my employer is quite flexible, and the pay is great. Sure, I could go elsewhere for a bit more money, but the risk of not enjoying the job as much is not a risk I’m willing to take. I love your thinking on this one!

    Mrs. Mad Money Monster
    Mrs. Mad Money Monster recently posted…That One Day I Blew Money In PhillyMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Sounds you have yourself a decent gig! Yeah it might be a little mean but I don’t feel bad for those people who lose theirs for not speaking up and taking their allotted time off.

      Reply
  13. Josh

    Sounds like your company has a great balance. It boils down to the grass isn’t always as green as the other side. I left my employer in August & stay in touch with some of my ex-coworkers. The quality of life has gotten worse since I left because of buyout talks from our competitor. The remaining operations supervisors are working around the clock & others have also left and found jobs that pay as much (or more) and have more time off.

    We didn’t get PTO or sick days, only the 3 or 4 weeks of annual vacation depending on length of service.
    Josh recently posted…Boxed.com ReviewMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Hi Josh. PTO is vacation time. I don’t know what I’d do with only 3 weeks off. Probably find another job. I value my time off so much. Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
  14. Jason

    I love my job. As a professor every day is different, I get to travel on the dime of the university, and I get to research what I think are the most interesting conversations across the world. I want financial independence, but not necessarily early retirement.

    Reply
    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      A few years ago I considered getting my Phd in accounting and becoming a professor. My school was trying to sell it since I guess their was a shortage of accounting professors. Starting salary was $150k a year! But going to school for another 5 years didn’t strike my fancy. I’m glad you have found such a great fit!

      Reply
  15. Laura Beth

    Being in a situation where you enjoy your job and have really good relationships with your co-workers and your boss is priceless. There’s something to be said about that, and you have 🙂 It’s worth the incremental difference in salary, in my opinion.

    I just left a good paying job because I was in the opposite position. When you don’t have camaraderie with your co-workers, it’s painstaking to even go to work. I didn’t take a pay cut, but I didn’t get a raise either. But for the first time in a long time, I have actually said the following statement, more than once actually: I love my job. And boy, that sure feels good.

    Excellent post!
    Laura Beth recently posted…Top Posts from Around the WebMy Profile

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  16. John

    I’ve pretty much retired now (still fiddle around doing a little contract work and financial coaching), but when I worked full time, I’d say – like many others – that work was work. I did it because I wanted to provide for my family. For the most part I enjoyed the work, but it was still, well…..work. When I started my own freelance company, it was still work, but at least I made more! But once my schedule was full, I turned down work as it would have required me to hire someone else to help me and, quite frankly, I didn’t want to. I guess I had moved to a place where I could afford to turn down additional income. Getting my financial house in order was the key……no debt (including no mortgage), moderate lifestyle relative to our income (ie, living below our means and having a high savings rate), and understanding the best (in my opinion!) way for us to invest for retirement.

    More money is nice, but it’s not the most important thing. I guess that’s why I harp on getting your personal finances straight when I coach a client. Doing so opens us so many more options in life, and you no longer have to chase the almighty dollar! If a job change makes sense and you welcome the challenge – and it pays you more! – go for it. But its so much nicer to be able to approach it as a new and exciting opportunity vs. just another job that pays you a little bit more to take 40+ hours of your life each week!

    John
    John recently posted…The Roth IRA – An investment account or an emergency fund?My Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Maybe I’ll have to pick your brain about going out on your own. I think that might be a path I choose once I get closer to FI. Maybe utilize my CPA to do part-time/contract work. Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply
  17. Odd Cents

    I would love to switch jobs, but the job market in Barbados sucks. I completed my MBA in 2013 and I’ve had less than ten interviews since then. In early January I completed the PMP designation and I’m hoping that it can lead to some better things. The reason I want to leave my job is because it is boring and there is no room for growth. I’ve been in this position for almost nine years and it’s stifling me. And on top of that, the pay sucks. I’d love to get a project management or business analysis related role. I’m a member of several associations, so they keep my brain active and I get excited about all of the possible things that I could do.
    Odd Cents recently posted…Paying For Tuition Out of PocketMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Yeah being willing to move for jobs definitely opens up a lot of doors with regards to compensation and other fringe benefits. Have you ever considered moving?

      Reply
  18. Harmony @ CreatingMyKaleidoscope

    I am in a very similar position. We have to pay off quite a bit of debt before we can reach financial semi-independence. I could likely move to a different company for more pay, but would have to sacrifice a ton of flexibility. My schedule is pretty perfect right now (for someone who is working full-time). I spend a few days per week in the office, but have the opportunity to come in late, leave early, and work from home on a regular basis. Yes, having more money would expedite our journey, but we can’t just live for the future. Having some balance now is worth something too.
    Harmony @ CreatingMyKaleidoscope recently posted…Side Hustle: How To Make Money By Being A Guinea PigMy Profile

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    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      I’ve been really bad at going to the office lately. The pros are: I get to see other humans; the cons are: I have to dress up, lug food to work or buy lunch, get distracted by others which makes my day longer, etc. Basically the cons of going in outweigh the pros, so I have just stayed home a lot lately. I don’t think I’d have that luxury if I left. I agree – flexibility is huge! Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Ehhhh enjoy would be a strong adjective. I wouldn’t do it for free! But while I’m building my nest egg, it isn’t so bad.

      Reply
  19. Andrew@LivingRichCheaply

    It makes sense to stay at your job when you like the people, it has flexibility and you enjoy it for the most part. I would say that is mostly true for my job. The grass is not always greener and I’ve seen people leave and come back.

    Reply
  20. fehmeen

    I think the work environment makes a huge difference, for both men and women. Money is usually the deciding factor but as you get more experienced professionally, you begin to realize that the work culture matters a lot too. A bad boss, lazy co-workers, late sitting without overtime are all going to make your work life hell, even if you get paid a lot.
    fehmeen recently posted…How To Save Money On Clothes – Frugal Families Saving and Budgeting TipsMy Profile

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  21. Bobby (Millennial Money Man)

    I was in a similar situation when I was a band director. I really liked my job, I loved the people I worked with, and obviously teaching kids is very rewarding as well. The problem for me was that I didn’t feel I made enough money. Teachers don’t get raises like those in the regular business world. 23 year olds make about $10,000 less than 50 year old teachers with 27 more years of experience. So, I started my own company for the money.

    So far it’s worked out, and I make significantly more than I used to. However…making more money doesn’t feel different the way I thought I would. It’s really strange! I agree with you – I’m not sure I’d recommend someone to leave their job just for more money. Take all of the other factors into account and see if making the jump to another job is REALLY what you want!

    Reply
    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Sounds like you made a great choice. The more money I make, it doesn’t really feel different because I don’t spend the money. It just increases my investment accounts, which in turn puts a smile on my face 🙂

      Reply
  22. Tommy @ LeisureFreak

    Great post. If you are happy where you are then there is no reason to look somewhere else. I happen to be currently an early retiree who gets those recruiter contacts from LinkedIn and other places too. My encore career that I retired from (in my second early retirement) came to me through LinkedIn. Regardless where the recruiters find me I always try to respond with a thank you but no thanks just to keep things friendly. The dream of most people is to create a life that you enjoy and our jobs is part of living. Money doesn’t pay enough to overcome being miserable so it shouldn’t be the reason anyone leaves a job they like. I know first hand and would take enjoying the people I work with, the work, and flexibility offered over any raise for something less desirable in those key areas. Whether that is becasue of moving to another company or accepting a promotion to something more stressful and away from my passions or interests.

    Reply
    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Hi Tommy. Thanks! With regards to recruiters I try to be nice but the volume and pestering sometimes is too much, so I ignore. You raise some great points I couldn’t agree more with. Take care.

      Reply
    1. Fervent Finance Post author

      Yeah I’m not burnt out yet. Sometimes I joke I’d like to get off to do some traveling 🙂

      Reply

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